As an engineer, I know firsthand how easy it can be to become lost in the minutia of a particular coding problem, or the roadmap of a product plan. As engaging as this can feel in the moment, it is imperative that we also remember to take a step back as often as we can to look back at the tools we are building through the eyes of the end user. This is not just a task for UX designers — everyone who builds something should understand how it is being used, by whom it is being used, and what…

I am not a specialist. This was a hard lesson for me to grasp for many years, and I would be lying if I said that I have fully learned it yet. For whatever reason, my instinct has always been to select role models who specialize in a particular area of their craft, rather than those who pursue a slightly wider range of skills. In an effort to rectify this, I am going to share some lessons I have learned over the past few years as I have made my way in the world of technology as a generalist.

What…

“We just heard from business that we cannot cut any of the requirements, but we still have to deliver all of these features by launch.” For some, hearing this during standup creates an instant sinking feeling and racing thoughts that start like, “there is no way…” or “how can we possibly…..” For a member of a high-functioning team, however, situations like this can be surprisingly easy to take in stride. For example, the team I am currently working on just recently beat our deadlines several times in a row while preparing for an important launch. …

If you spend any amount of time brainstorming solutions to a technical problem with an engineer, it will not be long before you arrive at the discussion of tradeoffs. More than any other domain I have worked in, I have found that software engineers are the most open to considering both the risks and opportunity costs of selecting one path over another. …

There are easily as many ways to think about software as there are software engineers. In fact, it seems safe to say there are probably N+1 ways to think of software because humans are not inherently efficient or consistent. Anyway, today I want to focus on one of the two most important lenses we can use to view our software. The first, of course, is to look at a piece of software through the eyes of the end user. The second way, which I’ll be discussing today, is from the perspective of the internal team who will need to support…

In early spring of 2019, as my Album Tags project turned one year old, I began a significant lift for the site that I had thus far been putting off; the migration to a relational database. Readers of earlier posts in this “series” may recall that I have toyed with this idea ever since the third version of the site’s MongoDB database. I had tried a few dry runs of cloud SQL databases in AWS and GCP and was intrigued by the ways this specific app might benefit from the feature development velocity and additional reliability a relational database could…

Today’s post is part 2 of a series I’m working on that details important lessons I’ve learned while building my music-focused web application, Album Tags. If you haven’t read the first post in this series, I recommend starting here for some background on the project. If you have never tried out the application, head over to www.albumtags.com to check it out!

This second installment in this series is going to focus on the most recent addition to the site: user-created album lists. While creating this feature, I learned about some new, powerful functionality in MongoDB and Mongoose that allows developers…

Greetings friends, well-wishers, and fellow learners! For those unaware I have been working at the Application Performance Management SaaS company New Relic for the past six months. Despite the blog-silence, I have kept to my word and have continued to learn something new every day! Definitely check out my repos for Node Projects, .NET Projects, and Ruby Projects as well as Album Tags and Counseling Book Tags to see some applications I’ve built during the learning process!

Today I am going to focus on one of those projects, Album Tags. I am now about nine months into the Album Tags…

I want to start this post with a thank you to everyone who has followed along this far. I started this blog while preparing to attend The Tech Academy boot camp where I learned software development and Agile project management. Wile posting here I also started a software development internship at Providence Health Plan and built several exciting and challenging projects on my own to push myself to learn new frameworks and technologies.

My favorite part of software development is that the learning is never over! My passion for learning is the main driver that got me into this field…

The second week of the live project has wrapped up with great success! I was able to contribute on several stories, both front-end and back-end, throughout the project. For those interested, I’ve posted some code samples and documentation on my GitHub to show the process and what I learned.

While I was working on the live project pretty much full time, I also took some time to review C# basics by taking a new C# course that The Tech Academy created since my first course. Hearing another senior developer’s perspective was helpful for getting some of the concepts I missed…

Joshua Hunsche Jones

I am a determined life-long learner and creator, as passionate about well-designed technology and software products as I am about meticulously crafted music.

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